The XXI Century Renaissance

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Knowledge has is origin in our perception used to say Leonardo da Vinci, and a new awareness is shyly facing into the developed world, where the conjunction of metaphysic with mathematic is opening the doors of a new Renaissance.

Kalos kagathos (Ancient Greek καλὸς κἀγαθός [kalos kaːɡatʰǒs]), of which kalokagathia (καλοκαγαθία) is the derived noun, is a phrase used by classical Greek writers to describe an ideal of personal conduct, especially in a military context. Its use is attested since Herodotus and the classical period.

The phrase is adjectival, composed of two adjectives, καλός (“beautiful”) and ἀγαθός (“good” or “virtuous”), the second of which is combined by crasis with καί “and” to form κἀγαθός. Werner Jaeger summarizes it as ”the chivalrous ideal of the complete human personality, harmonious in mind and body, foursquare in battle and speech, song and action”.

In my youth I remained dazzled the first time I saw the Botticelli’s Venus, maybe one of the reason why I’ve decided to make Beauty my center of gravity in the future years, and shells one of my business in life.

But the Renaissance has his origin in the genuine Chivalry , Chivalry refers to the lifestyle and moral code followed by medieval knights. It takes its name from chevalier, the French word for knight. Chivalry included the values of honor, valor, courtesy, and purity, as well as loyalty to a lord, a cause, or a noblewoman.

Its basis was a blend of military, social, and Christian ethics. Although chivalry began as a code of conduct for medieval warriors, it adapted to the changing social conditions of the Renaissance.

Handbooks from the 1200s laid out the rules of behavior for knights, and pageants and tournaments celebrated chivalric honor. Because knights were part of the culture of feudal courts, their behavior inspired terms such as courtly, courtship, and courtesy, a cool trend, powered from Women and remained popular in the late Middle Ages and well into the Renaissance. Wealthy Renaissance nobles continued to promote military traditions and to show off their strength in tournaments and in war. However, unlike knights of the Middle Ages, who often acted on their own, they tended to form knightly orders and brotherhoods supported by the ruling government. By 1469 such orders had formed in almost every major court in Europe.

As often happens in history and hopefully in the now to come New Renaissance Women are the key to change and capable to make the difference.

The first—and greatest—of the French romances was The Song of Roland (1098), which tells the story of Roland, a brave warrior who died protecting the French army. However, the most influential chivalric romance was the story of the Welsh king Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table. This legend developed from the writings of the French author Chrétien de Troyes. It includes such familiar characters as Lancelot, Guinevere, Percival, and Sir Gawain.

The tales of Arthur’s knights provided a pattern of action that appears in most romances. First, a knight sets out on a quest: he must save a lady, right a wrong, complete a task, slay a dragon, break a spell, or find the way to heaven. Along the way he has adventures that test his strength, and he must behave according to a code of conduct. Sometimes he is strong enough, but his luck (or Fortune) may be bad. Good knights try to do the right thing, but they often find themselves in difficult situations. The plots of chivalric romances include many common elements, such as jousts, tournaments, strange customs, giants, enchantments, and flying horses. Some critics argue that readers can interpret these elements as symbols that have moral meanings.

During the 1300s and 1400s, medieval French romances were expanded, altered, and translated into English, Spanish, and Italian.

Italy was home to the most popular romances during the Renaissance. There, writers combined the romance of chivalry with the epic*. Italian poet Ludovico ARIOSTO’s Orlando Furioso (Mad Roland, 1516) is particularly notable because its narrator is both self-conscious and mocking. Orlando Furioso had enormous influence on Renaissance literature and literary criticism. The story was so popular that it touched off an explosion of romances based on its minor characters. Jerusalem Delivered (1580), by poet Torquato TASSO, is the other Italian masterpiece of the 1500s.

During the years of discovery and conquest in North America in the late 1500s, Spain saw a vast outpouring of chivalric romances. By 1575, more romances were translated from Spanish than from French. Spain’s Miguel de CERVANTES wrote one of the most enduring works inspired by the code of chivalry, Don Quixote (1605). It tells the story of a gentleman from La Mancha whose mind has been seriously affected by reading romances.

In England, chivalric romances were the most popular form of fiction after the introduction of printing. In 1485 William Caxton, the first English printer, printed Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur (The Death of Arthur), a version of the King Arthur legend. English poets of the late 1500s, such as Philip SIDNEY and Edmund SPENSER, created works inspired by the romance tradition.

The tradition of chivalry did not survive the changing political climate of Europe following the Renaissance.

Materialism and self-interest soon replaced the knightly code of honor. The values of old nobility gave way to the democracies of France and America and to the Industrial Revolution that now is facing his limits and paradoxes.

That’s why I see in words as Sustainability an invigorating trend of a new reason of interpreting Virtue and Beauty that Women consciousness before all is claiming.

Phenomena like Madonna or Lady Gaga are outdated, and remain alive just in the style of ‘’villains’’.

On the contrary, still timidly but forcefully testimonials like Suzy Amis Cameron, Livia Firth, Charlotte Casiraghi, Laura Bailey, Samata Angel, Baroness Lola Young, Kirsten Dukes and many others are facing the Red and the Green Carpet of Fashion and Lifestyle, but also male trendsetters like Nik Thakkar, Oskar Metsavaht, and why not me 😉

A better world is coming up…stay tuned 😉

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